The Porsche 935 needs little introduction if you know your historic race cars. It emerged out of the 1970’s Porsche 911 Turbo. It was prolific, winning 123 of the 370 races it entered. Those wins included outright success at the 24 Hours of Le Mans 1979, 1,000 km of Nurburgring and at Sebring.

For all it’s success, the Porsche 935 never got an official, road legal production run. The cars were sold through Porsche to its customer teams, confined to the race track. One managed to gain road legalisation. Owned by famous entrepreneur Walter Wolf, the car in question was converted by Kremer Racing with input from Ekkehard Zimmermann.

Porsche were reluctant to sell 935’s to customer teams. It’s is rumoured that Wolf tried to convince the factory to sell him an evolution model and convert it for road use. Porsche declined. Kremer Racing were more than happy to oblige though. Kremer eventually built a genuine Kremer K3 with 98% of the parts from a 24h of Le Mans car.

This particular Porsche 935 shared the 2.85-liter twin-turbo, twin spark 6-cylinder boxer engine slightly detuned to deliver 740hp at 8,000 rpm through a 4-speed 930/30-gearbox. The bodywork was pure Kremer K3 with small concessions, blinking lights and side markers, a speedometer in km/h and a new exhaust system. The suspension was raised by 10cm and the interior gained some comfort, a Recaro seat and parts from the 930 Turbo.

The road legal Kremer K3 is now offered for sale with 10,124 km on the odometer. Mechatronik are the venders who confirm that it comes with the original Vehicle Registration Certificate, the customs papers for Switzerland and EU import docs. It is certainly the most unique Porsche on the market today! Wolf had to go to the trouble of registering the car in Alberta, Canada so quite whether it qualifies for road registration in Europe is another question.

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